Better connections, better policing

Better connections, better policing

Howard Broad, Police Commissioner

This is the 50th Police Dispatch to be posted since this space on our Police website launched last year.
 
Information is the lifeblood of policing, so it makes sense to increase the flow in all directions.
 
We connect with the public through a growing range of channels:

  • - A daily diet of news releases are provided by police staff up and down the country and posted on the website.
  • - Police Ten 7 screened its 250th episode last week. It's the longest running of 13 current television shows involving police. In 9 years, Police Ten 7 has featured more than 700 serious crimes and contributed to hundreds of arrests. Its consistently high ratings reflect the number of people who want to help us solve crime. 
  • - Crimestoppers: The anonymous crime reporting line was launched last October and runs independently of Police. In its first six months, it received nearly 3,200 reports of crime by phone and email. Actionable information is passed on to police. 
  • - Queenstown Police was our first police station on Facebook. It launched a page 18 months ago to expand the net for offenders. The page has a strong local following and has notched up some good results
  • - Bay of Plenty District recently started using Twitter to distribute news, alerts and information, targeting a wider, younger audience.

New technology will bring more ways for police to connect with the public, but the traditional channels will always be important. Each district and community develops its own methods. Some have 0800 hotlines to ring in connection with high profile cases; many use suburban news papers to update the public with local crime issues.
 
Above all, the public values police officers who are visible, accessible and real. High tech options will evolve over the coming years, but you will always be able to visit or phone your local station or ask an officer in the street to help you.