Commissioner Peter Marshall takes up post

Commissioner Peter Marshall takes up post

 

New Police Commissioner Peter Marshall has taken up his position, replacing Howard Broad who retired last week.
 
Peter returns to Police National Headquarters in Wellington after four years with the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force, most recently as its Commissioner. He has been appointed for a three-year term of office.
 
Peter joined New Zealand Police as a recruit in 1972. He has held a wide range of uniform and CIB positions in New Zealand, from officer in charge of CIB training at the Police College to head of the Hawkes Bay Armed Offenders Squad, and from Area Commander in Hastings and Auckland City to Assistant Commissioner.
 
He commanded high-profile operations including the policing of the 1999 APEC Conference, which included the visit of US President Bill Clinton, and America's Cup in Auckland.
 
Overseas service includes postings at the New Zealand High Commission in Canberra from May 1998 to December 2002 and the New Zealand Embassy in Washington DC from June 2002 to January 2004. In this position he was responsible for establishing strategic liaison contacts with Federal, State and local law enforcement agencies in the Americas in the wake of the September 11 attacks.
 
Peter held the position of Assistant Commissioner at Police National Headquarters for three years before his secondment to the Solomons, where he was appointed Commissioner in March 2009, having relieved in that position since early 2008.
 
In his four years with the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force he had to deal with simmering civil tensions, a deadly tsunami and regular incidents involving crocodiles.
 
While he is likely to face very different challenges in New Zealand, Peter says the need for an efficient, professional and highly ethical police service is universal.
 
"New Zealanders want to see police officers who are approachable, personable and give the reassurance they are looking for," he says.
 
"Being able to do that is one reason people join Police in the first place. We have extremely skilful specialist groups but we have to strike a balance."
 
He says his approach to his Commissionership will be transparent. "If we, as an organisation, have erred I will put my hands up to it. We will learn from the experience, we will put measures in place and we will move on.
 
"If, on the other hand, we are wrongly maligned I will be quick to point that out to the media and public in no uncertain terms."
 
Peter was made a member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2000. He has received a Royal Humane Society Award for bravery and various police commendations. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia, and holds diplomas in New Zealand Policing and Business Studies.
 
He is married to Pamela and they have two adult daughters.
 
Mike Bush, former District Commander of Counties-Manukau, has taken up his position as Deputy Commissioner Operations, joining Deputy Commissioner Resource Management Viv Rickard on the Police Executive.