Crimestoppers: let's solve bottle assault

Crimestoppers: let's solve bottle assault

Howard Broad, Police Commissioner

The anonymous tip-off line, Crimestoppers, has shown pleasing results for its first six months of operation.
 
Almost 3,200 crime-related calls and emails have been received. Police have been able to take action on more than 1,300.
 
About 65% of tip-offs were about drugs, which is to be expected. Not only is the illicit drug market highly competitive, it's also so destructive that families, friends and neighbours are motivated to do something about it.
 
Information is the lifeblood of policing.
 
Sometimes it adds to a picture of evidence; sometimes it is all we have to go on.
 
Think of Mary Loader, the 65-year old grandmother who was hit in the face with a beer bottle thrown from a car.
 
It happened on a quiet Sunday morning in Papamoa, near Tauranga, and it was all over in a flash. The bottle was thrown; Mrs Loader fell to the ground. Other drivers passed by without realising what had happening. Only one witness has come forward, but at the time she was understandably more concerned about Mrs Loader than the offender's description.
 
Mrs Loader, whose life was threatened by horrendous injuries, has no memory of the incident.
 
It's possible the person who threw the bottle did not mean to hit anyone. They might not have realised at the time they had done so.
 
But there has been so much publicity that by now, they must know. And the other people in the car must know. Their friends and family probably have some idea about it too.
 
In a case like this, their information is absolutely critical. The thrower's intention would make a difference to the outcome of this case, but the longer it takes for someone to come forward with information, the worse it looks for them.
 
The anonymous Crimestoppers line (0800 555 111) is one way to contact police and bring this awful incident to a close.
 
The Papamoa case featured on Police Ten 7 (Episode 11, 22 April)