Police Commissioners say no to family violence

Police Commissioners say no to family violence

National News

Police Commissioners from every state and territory in Australia and New Zealand have joined together to combat family violence.

The Australasian Policing Strategy on the Prevention and Reduction of Family Violence was launched today to coincide with White Ribbon Day - White Ribbon Day is the international day when men in particular, wear a white ribbon to show they do not tolerate or condone men's violence towards women.

The inaugural Australasian strategy will look at ways in which policing jurisdictions can work together to develop strong and consistent policies and practices which will contribute to safer homes, safer women and children and a reduction in family violence.

New Zealand Police Commissioner Howard Broad said White Ribbon Day was an international day chosen by the United Nations so that countries could show support for ending violence against women.

"This strategy signals my will and that of my colleagues across the Tasman to make a determined and united stand against one of the most entrenched crime problems in all our jurisdictions.

"The Australasian Police Commissioners are committed to holding perpetrators accountable and providing compassionate responses to women and children who experience violence."

"The key principles and priorities outlined in the strategy are universal and in New Zealand we are already working to achieve them."

"When police take action on family violence, we demonstrate that violence against women and children is unacceptable and will not be tolerated in our community at any time. To coin t he now well known phrase "it's not ok" Mr Broad said.

"There are a number of benefits in adopting this Australasian strategy, including a collegial approach with our Australian Policing colleagues. We already enjoy a close relationship with Australian jurisdictions and New Zealand and Australian Police work together in a number of Pacific locations including Timor Leste and the Solomon Islands.

"The strategy means that we are working towards the same outcomes and gives us a real opportunity to learn from each other and realise progress."

In New Zealand;  • 64 per cent of all 'serious' assaults and   • 44 per cent of all 'grievous' assaults Police attend, are family violence related   • also 34 per cent of 'minor' assaults are identified as Family Violence  • family violence affects a third of all women during their lifetime. (Fanslow)   • 45% of murders in New Zealand are Family Violence related  • we also have a Family Violence repeat rate of more than 40 per cent

Official NZ Police statistics from 2007-2008 show a 15 per cent increase in the number of family violence incidents and offences, with more than 86,000 reports being made.

Protection Orders, in over 90 per cent of instances, are granted to women,

From these statistics alone, we can see the need for such a strategy in our response to family Violence. Our colleagues in Australia face similar facts.

The strategy is online at http://www.police.govt.nz/resources.

ENDS

For more information contact: 04 474 9482